The complete guide to listed buildings in the United Kingdom

Preserving the beauty of our wilds and our links to the past by preserving historic buildings is of the utmost importance. Not only is this a way to teach our children about where we come from – it’s also a way to reflect on the innovations of that period and reimagine them to suit the scenarios we deal with today. Find out more on listed buildings in the UK by reading on.

History of listed
buildings

The United Kingdom has
long prided itself on the exquisite works produced by their forefathers, so it
isn’t surprising that they’ve gone to great lengths to protect these historic
architectural artworks. This desire to protect buildings has been present for
centuries, but listed buildings are a relatively new category when you look at
the historical timeline.

Discussions for creating a listed building category were already in motion to some effect in the early 1900s, but the discussion was accelerated during World War II when German bombing raids destroyed many historic buildings. The devastation left behind in the wake of the war helped to solidify the understanding that preserving historical landmarks was an important part of our societal duties.

What is a listed building?

A listed building in the UK is a structure that has been placed on a statutory list that is maintained by Historic England, Historic Environmental Scotland, Cadw, or the Northern Ireland Environment Agency. These four agencies maintain the lists in order to help protect the historic value associated with listed buildings in the UK.

The majority of sites
that appear on the listed building list are actual buildings, but there are
some exceptions. Bridges, monuments, sculptures, milestones and mileposts, war
memorials – even the Abbey Road pedestrian crossing featured in The Beatles’
cover art are also considered listed buildings.

Regulations

Part of this protection for listed buildings in the UK is to regulate extensions, alterations, and demolitions. Each of the four committees works to determine whether it is appropriate for any sort of improvement project or demolition to be done. There are many factors that go into this, but one of the most important is simply making sure that the projects done on these buildings are either absolutely necessary (in the case of demolition), won’t cause damage to the building, or make it impossible to reverse the changes made to the building without damage.

Local Planning Authority

These specifications can make it difficult to make any sort of improvements to listed buildings. The best way to work around this is to contact your local chapter of these agencies and talk with them extensively about the changes you would like to make to the listed structure. Take note of any concerns they may have about the project and the permits/information they’ll need from you later in order to help get the approval you’ll need to start your updates.

What is the difference between a listed building and an ancient monument?

A listed building is
any type of historic structure that has been determined necessary to preserve
because of its historical significance. These buildings often have ties to some
sort of important historical event or an influential person (or group of
people). An example of this can be seen with the Globe Theatre which was
determined to be significant because of Shakespeare’s connection to the
location.

Ancient monuments, however, fall into a different class. They are not ‘listed’ – instead, any ancient monument that is determined to be historically significant and of national importance is ‘scheduled.’ Although this name suggests that only ancient structures and locations can be scheduled, this is far from true. Examples of more recent structures that have been categorized as ‘ancient monuments’ are war defences.

What requirements must a structure meet to be a listed building?

A listed building is
any building that has either architectural importance or historical importance.
In some cases, there are structures that meet both of these requirements.
Additionally, almost any structure or location can be listed – there is no requirement
that a listed building in the UK should actually be a building, despite the
implications that are made by the name.

There are certain criteria that must be met for a building to be listed, however. Because there are many buildings with some sort of historical architectural importance, there are many who take the additional step of qualifying structures to the ‘UK listed buildings’ list by using the following criteria.

Criteria for making a building a listed building

In order to make the
listed building list, there are certain criteria that the building or structure
in question should meet. This helps to narrow down the list of structures that
are considered a priority when it comes to preservation – especially when it
comes to determining historical architectural significance.

Age and rarity

These two factors are one of the most important when it comes to determining the importance of a structure and if it should be included in the listed building UK list. There are two main thoughts behind these criteria.

  • The
    older the building is, the more likely it is to be listed. This is especially
    true for buildings that were constructed before the year 1700.
  • The rarer
    a building is, the more likely it is to be listed. If there were over 2,000
    houses built in 1897 and designed in exactly the same manner, it is unlikely
    that all of them would be listed.

Though both of these
criteria are for the same category, there tend to be some differences in how
they are handled. Specifically, the age of a structure is the biggest
determining factor when it comes to this piece of criteria:

  1. If a
    building was built before the year 1700 and is considered to hold ‘a
    significant proportion of their original fabric’ it will be listed without
    question.
  2. If a
    building was constructed between 1700 and 1840, it will most likely be listed.
    Slightly more attention will be given to the condition of the structure and the
    rarity of the structure. Despite this, the age itself tends to make an
    exceptional case for rarity and most are accepted.
  3. If a
    building was completed after the year 1840, there is considerably more time
    that goes into making the decision of listing the building. Usually, only
    buildings in excellent condition, or a condition that can be restored to its
    original quality, will be listed.
  4. If a
    building was constructed after the year 1945, the four committees spend
    considerable time when they make their decision over whether the building
    should be listed or not. They emphasize that ‘particularly careful selection’
    is applied in these cases.

Buildings that are no more than 30 years old are hardly ever considered to merit the title of a listed building in the UK. However, there are special considerations that can be made if these structures are ‘of outstanding quality and under threat.’

Suggested further reading: Period windows: all about your listed building windows

Aesthetic merits

Aesthetic merits
(especial those concerning significant historical architectural practices) are
a very big factor when it comes to accepting a building onto the listed
building UK list. It has been determined that a building should be
aesthetically pleasing to make the list. There have, however, been instances
when buildings that are not aesthetically pleasing have been accepted onto the
list because they represent certain aspects of social and/or economic history.

Selectivity

When there are a large
number of a certain type of building that has survived into the modern era
(especially those that were constructed around the same time), the committees
will only list the buildings that serve as the best representations of that
particular building style. Buildings that hold some sort of historical
significance, however, may still be preserved over a building in better
condition but with no significance.

National interest

Another key determination in deciding which buildings should be listed is the national interest that they may represent. For example, buildings that represent a nationally important but localized industry are likely to be listed. Additionally, buildings that are significant or distinctive to their region will likely be listed in the UK listed buildings.

Can you apply to register a building as a listed building?

You can have a
building in your area listed by applying to the secretary of state. This is
done by going to the Historic England web page and submitting an application detailing
the importance of the building and why you think it should be listed. You do
not have to own the building in order to attempt to have it added to the listed
buildings list.

Once the Historic England committee looks over your application, they will forward their advice to the Secretary of State. The Secretary of State will then make a final decision on whether the building should be listed or not. The same process as detailed above is also used to determine which buildings should be delisted.

What are the different listed buildings categories?

A building qualifies as listed because different qualities, but only three grades may be assign to those added in the list. Although the criteria and grading status may vary depending on what committee and country oversee a particular building, these are some similarities that carry over. These are the criteria for England and Wales.

Grade I

Grade I structures are considered to be buildings of exceptional interest. Only 2.5 per cent of over 370,000 listed buildings qualified as a Grade I status. Interestingly, 45 per cent of all Grade I listed buildings are churches.

Examples of Grade I
structures include:

  • Tower
    Bridge in London
  • The
    Cenotaph in London
  • The
    Manchester Liverpool Road Railway Station in Manchester
  • The
    Pontcyscyllte Aqueduct in North Wales
  • The
    Humber Bridge in East Riding of Yorkshire
  • The
    Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol
  • The
    Palace of Westminister in London
  • The
    Warwick Castle in Warwick
  • The
    Portchester Castle in Hampshire

Grade II*

Grade II* are structures that are considered ‘particularly important buildings of more than special interest. Only 5.5 per cent of all 370,000 listed building in the UK qualified as Grade II*. 

Examples of Grade II*
structures include:

  • The
    Cleveland Bridge in Bath
  • The
    Trellick Tower in London
  • St
    John’s Jerusalem in Kent
  • Shibden
    Hall in Calderdale
  • Middlesbrough
    Transporter Bridge in Middlesbrough
  • Rise
    Hall in East Riding of Yorkshire
  • The
    Battersea Power Station in London
  • The
    Capel Manor House in Kent
  • The
    Coliseum Theatre in London
  • The
    Manchester Town Hall Extension in Manchester

Grade II

Grade II buildings are structures considered to be ‘of special interest, warranting every effort to preserve them.’ The majority of listed buildings are placed on the Grade II list. About 92 per cent of all listed buildings qualified as Grade II listed building!

Examples of Grade II
structures include:

  • The Broomhill Pool in Ipswich
  • The BT Tower in London
  • The Whitechapel Bell Foundry in London
  • The India House in London
  • The Surbiton Railway Station in London
  • The Abbey Road Studios in London
  • The Kursaal in Southend-On-Sea

Locally listed buildings

In addition to nationally recognized listed buildings, there are also many city councils that choose to make their own listed buildings list. The Birmingham City Council and the Crawley Borough Council have their local list. Sometimes these locally listed buildings also belong to the nationally listed buildings list – but this isn’t necessarily the case.

City councils sort these locally listed buildings into three different grades: Grade A, Grade B, and Grade C.

Grade A

Grade A structures are
considered to be of statutory list quality. They are so prioritized because
they are ‘to be the subject of the notification of Historic England if
imminently threatened.

Grade B 

Grade B structures are
seen as being important in terms of the city’s surrounding architecture or
local street scene context.

Grade C

Grade C structures are
considered to be significant in the local and historical context – including
buildings that have industrial archaeological features, making them worthy of
retention.

These structures make up the architectural history of England. So, once you decide to go to the United Kingdom, or a resident seeking to find new adventures, check out these historical sites and marvel at their beauty!

This article was written on behalf of Boulton & Boyce by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

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Listed Buildings Search: listed buildings and how you identify one

Listed Buildings Search is a tool that can help you look up listed buildings in England, Wales, and Scotland. Listed buildings across the United Kingdom refers to a building that has been placed on the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Currently, the United Kingdom has nearly 500,000 listed buildings registered. By reading on, you can learn about what this means especially if you happen to live in or own property that is considered to be a listed building.

What is a listed building?

Listed buildings must meet specific criteria before they can be considered listed. Listed buildings must be a man-made structure that has survived in something close to its original condition. The list primarily consists of buildings, but it can also include monuments, bridges, and other notable areas.

Historical timeline

 All buildings that were built before 1700 and are very close to their original condition are considered listed. Most buildings built between 1700 and 1840 are also considered listed as long as they are close to their original condition. As time goes on, the criteria to make the list becomes stricter, so any building after 1945 must be of exceptional importance in order to be listed. Anything less than 30 years old is not eligible for listed status.

Listing grades

Damages to period buildings during World War II when the Germans bombed England necessitated the creation of statutory lists. Prior to this, only important ancient monuments had statutory protection or state recognition. The Town and Country Planning Act 1947 developed a process for listing structures, creating the first formal list of these listed buildings.

England and Wales

In England and Wales, three grades applies to listed buildings: Grade I, Grade II*, Grade II. Grade I are buildings that are sometimes considered internationally important but are all of exceptional interest. This is such a strict grade that only 2.5% of the listed buildings are Grade I. Grade II* buildings are important buildings that are considered more than just special interest. Only about 5.5% of listed buildings are of this grade. Lastly, Grade II are buildings that are of special interest and nationally important. This is the grade that listed buildings are most likely to be classified as, with about 92% of all buildings fitting in this classification.

Scotland

In Scotland, they use a 3-category system of A, B, and C. The Scottish assessment criteria is slightly different from the grades in England and Wales, meaning that the grade II* may not be the same as the Scotland criteria for their category B.

Additional Information
about Listed Buildings

There was a massive outcry in 1980 at the demolition of the Firestone Factory, a classic art deco building. This outcry led to the government reinstituting a resurvey of buildings to make sure that they didn’t miss any single one that should be preserved and add any necessary buildings to that list. During this time, officials added the largest number of buildings to the list. Around 36,000 buildings were added just in 1987. The process was primarily completed by 1989 and buildings have been rarely added since this time. For instance, in 2013 they added just 420 buildings to the list. In 2016, 1,156 structure were added. This later boom of additional structures to the lists were mostly war memorials and war-related structures that were not originally considered to meet the criteria.

What You Need to Know
about Listed Buildings

If a property you live in or own is considered to be “listed,” you don’t have 100% control over any changes that are made to the property in both the interior and exterior of the building. Before doing anything on the property, owners need to apply for Listed Building Consent for any work impacting the “special architectural or historic interest” of the property.

You might also want to check out: Listed buildings – knowing the ins and outs of owning a listed property

What it covers

Listing does cover the whole property unless otherwise excluded in the list description. This also covers later extensions or additions to the building, attached structures and fixtures, and any pre-1948 buildings on the land attached to the building. Every building is unique, so what the listing covers for each building can vary greatly. Not every protected detail will be properly mentioned. This is why it is essential to check with the local planning authority before you do any work to make sure that you are not going against any regulations on the property.

Making the changes

Protection doesn’t mean that you can’t make any changes to the property. The Local Planning Authority usually approves most cases of applications for alterations on the property.

Assessment of the proposed alterations

There will be a thorough assessment of the proposed changes to ensure that the changes won’t have a major impact on the historic aesthetic of the building. A conservation officer that works at the local authority planning department will take care of this assessment. Ask them about what you want to achieve with your changes. They will let you know what is acceptable. The conservation officers are typically very flexible. They can be a great resource to get advice from before starting any project. If a building is a Grade I or II*, the assessment will be done by English Heritage or some other similar body.

Getting approval

A proper approval must be obtained first before getting any work done on your property. It can also be a big mistake to assume that your builder understands all of the laws regarding listed properties. Working with a conservation officer is the best approach you can do.

Use a Listed Buildings
Search

You should use the Listed Buildings Search to verify if your property is on the list. If it is, you must go through all of the proper channels to make sure that any alterations that you want to make to the property are approved. Not doing so could be a very costly mistake. The Listed Buildings Search is easy to use, allowing you to search by keyword or postcode to find your property. The search tool also shows the grade of the property, if listed. This is all valuable information that you may need in the future. Whether you are a local or a tourist, the Listed Buildings Search will help you discover the wonders and heritage of England!

This article was written on behalf of Boulton & Boyce by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

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British Listed Buildings Register: how and why buildings get listed

England has plenty of historic buildings and architecture that help it retain some of that old-world charm. The British Listed Buildings register is an online database of all the buildings and structures that are considered to be of historic and of special architectural interest. This guide lets you know the official listing data as well as allow you to see the building’s location on a map. You can also see it in Google Streetview, if available. There are a few reasons why this register is important: to give you information if you want to see some historic sites or to know if you live in a building that’s considered to be historic. Buildings in Wales, England, and Scotland are maintained on this list.

You might also want to check out: Listed buildings map: all the listed buildings in England

What Types of Structures
and Buildings are on the British Listed Buildings Register?

Most of the sites that you can find on this list are buildings, but this list is not exclusively about just buildings. There are other structures that are listed on the British Listed Buildings register including war memorials, sculptures, bridges, and monuments. There are even important milestones and mileposts that are included. You may even be surprised to know that the Abbey Road pedestrian crossing made famous by The Beatles are on this list.

History of the British
Listed Buildings Register

Ancient, uninhabited, and military structures are often classified as “scheduled monuments” that are protected by older legislation. One example of this is the Stonehenge. A limited number of these were protected under the Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1882. However, they were reluctant to tell owners of restricted properties about what they could do to their own property. The bombings during World War II by the Germans eventually led them to list buildings that had particular architectural merit that deemed certain protections.

Creating the list

Between the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings and the Royal Institute of British Architects, 300 members were asked to create a list of these buildings of merit under the supervision of the Inspectorate of Ancient Monuments. This project was funded by the treasury. The original intent of this list was to decide whether or not a building should be rebuilt should it be damaged during these bombings.

Developing and improving the list

A more comprehensive act was developed using this older practice called the Town and Country Planning Act 1947, which covered Wales and England, and the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1947, which focused on Scotland. In 1972, this practice was introduced to Northern Ireland by the Planning (Northern Ireland) Order 1972.

Listed buildings are considered to be of “special and historic importance” while ancient monuments are considered of “national importance.”

What it takes to be listed

Buildings considered for listing or delisting need to go through a process that starts with applying to the secretary of state. Learn more about getting any property listed in this section.

Applying for listed status

Historic England reviews submitted applications to consider whether to list a property or not. To apply for the listing or delisting of a building, you don’t actually need to be the owner of the building. The Historic England website has all of the information that you could possibly need to learn about the process, including guidance on how to fill out the application. Historic England also assesses buildings to apply for this protected status as well.

What can get listed

Practically anything can be listed on the British Listed Buildings Register; this list is not exclusively buildings. Any structure or building of historic interest can be listed and can come in a variety of different types. To accommodate this, Historic England has 20 broad categories as well as guides to help assess the various buildings and structures.

About Listed Buildings

There are 3 types of listed status for these buildings in Wales and England: Grade I, Grade II*, and Grade II. Grade I is the label for buildings that are considered “of exceptional interest.” Grade II* refers to important buildings that are considered to be more than just of special interest, while Grade II is of special interest. Grade I is the highest level, meaning every effort to preserve the buildings is necessary. Listed buildings can account for about 2% of the building stock in England. As of March 2010, there were nearly 374,000 entries on the list. Grade II buildings make up 92% of all listed buildings, with Grade I making up only about 2.5%.

Age and rarity

There are specific criteria for listed buildings in addition to just being of historic or architectural interest or being associated with significant events or people. One part of this is the age and rarity of the building. A building is more likely to be considered listed the older it is. All buildings that were built prior to 1700 are listed. A majority of the buildings erected between 1700 and 1840 will also be listed. After this time, the selection process for listed buildings is more strict. For example, buildings less than 30 years old rarely become listed.

Aesthetic merits

The building also needs to have “aesthetic merits”, meaning that the appearance needs to have visual interest. It should also be of national interest, which means that the buildings are distinctive or significant to the region. The state of repair of the building is not a relevant consideration when deciding on a building’s listing. Imminent changes which can affect the historic charm and character of the building may also be grounds for an emergency listing. An emergency-basis listing may usually be done when the building is in danger of being demolished or altered.

Extent of protection

A building’s listed status does not just apply to the exterior of the building. This also refers to the various aspects of the interior, including the fittings, fixtures, and objects within the building. Buildings can be delisted, but this rarely happens.

Why This Matters

Knowing whether your property is listed is important because this means that you have strict guidelines to follow. You are not able to do much with your property without special permission from the local planning authority. Thanks to the British Listed Buildings Register, you can search for properties to find out if your property is listed. You may also check out other amazing listed structures on your way.

This article was written on behalf of Boulton & Boyce by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

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Listed Buildings Map: all the listed buildings in England

“–This royal throne of kings, this sceptered isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise, This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war, This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands,–This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.”
Richard II,2.1 (excerpts)

How do you think of England without considering its millennia-spanning
history or its storied role in the last millennium filled with utter villains
and heroic princes?  And can you
contemplate England without acknowledging its vast contribution to western
civilization’s literature, science, technology, law, and even the language
spoken throughout the world?  When you
visit England, you’ll find they have passed a series of laws protecting their
heritage and set aside over 500,000 sites, buildings, monuments, wrecks,
gardens, and parks to be legally protected. 
These are placed on a list by the Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England, also known as Historic England, a non-departmental
public body of the British government.  There
are similar groups fulfilling the same task in Scotland, Wales, and Northern
Ireland if you wish to explore those regions.

What does it mean to be a listed building?

Quite simply, a listed building is a heritage asset that has been placed on the statutory list maintained by Historic England.  If the building is on the list, it cannot be modified, demolished, renovated, or changed in any way without special permission from the local government, who typically involve the federal government and national “amenity” societies.  Depending on the structure or the contemplated repair, the owner may be required to use special tools or building techniques that may not have been in use for centuries.  Failure to comply can result in criminal charges filed against the owner.

Classification of listed buildings

Specific procedures and processes follow the designation as a heritage asset and placement on the statutory list and legally protected.  To confuse matters, the British government has passed different legislation protecting different assets.  A building is “listed”, wrecks are “protected”, ancient monuments are “scheduled”, and locations of special historical, archaeological, architectural, cultural or artistic interest are “registered.”  However, regardless of how they designate the asset, it is generally considered to be on the English Heritage Listed Buildings. 

The lists are further classified into
grade:

  • Grade I define a building or a
    site that is of exceptional interest. 
    The Palace at Westminster, Warwick Castle, and the Tower of London fall
    into these categories.  These locations
    typically have a great deal of history behind them and are generally well-known.
  • Grade II* define a listing that is considered important of more
    than special interest.  Battersea Power
    Station and Trellick Tower in London are two sites that fit this
    classification.  Some of these have a history
    while others are considered unique to England and the English culture.
  • Grade II are buildings of
    special interest and every effort should be made to preserve them.  Whitechapel Bell Foundry and Abbey Road
    Studios fall into these categories. 
    Again, these have historical interest, perhaps on a localized level but
    are part of the English history and tradition.

How do
you find a Listed Building?

In London alone, there are over 10,000 listed locations and almost half a million in England alone.  There is a recorded history of some kind for each one.  Simply trying to see every listed location in London would take you 27 years if you saw one each day. 

Historic
England

Historic England has an interactive website that you can spend hours on that will help you locate and provide a map of the location.  So, if you want to find Abbey Road crossing in northwest London where the famous photograph of the Beatles was taken for their album cover, the map can help.  It may take some time to get where you want.  If you’re not familiar with the site, or worse, you don’t know your way around London, you might search for hours. 

When I typed in “Abbey Road”, the map generated fourteen different possibilities.  Abbey Road was listed in fourteen locations forcing me to do a further search to cross-reference the correct citation.  I didn’t know it was in greater London, or near Regent’s Park, or Camden but I need to accept a large part of the blame.  It’s a map containing records and information on 10,000 points and I need to get my act together and provide a little more information in my search. 

English
Heritage

Another group called English Heritage also generates a map for English listed buildings.  They are privately funded but generate a map that is also easily used to find locations of listed buildings and other points of interest.

The two organizations provide English citizens and tourists alike the opportunity to see the culture of England.

The Heritage of England

There are almost 10,000 years of history in England.  The British government, via Historic England, is undertaking a prodigious effort to preserve and protect the accomplishments of the English culture during that time.  It takes an outsider sometimes to understand and appreciate the accomplishments of others.  Historic England has provided a venue for visitors, and inhabitants to learn and grasp the importance of what has been contributed by the English culture.  The English Heritage Listed Buildings Map they created enables users to quickly find and learn about England’s past.

This article was written on behalf of Boulton & Boyce by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

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Replacement windows: what can be in place of your historic windows

Traditional windows are important to the heritage of your listed properties. However, the old age of the windows itself may cause problems to its functionality, such as the rotting of the frame, poor energy efficiency, and hardware problems. This may lead you to the conclusion of replacing them altogether, and here’s what you need to know before that big decision.

Repair over replace

Repairs are always prioritized over replacements, and that is because the windows from listed buildings hold a significant history within its architecture. Replacements for the timber frames are not as durable as the classic timber, and crown glass panes for the windows are not manufactured anymore. That is why it is important to salvage what you can from the traditional windows before replacing any material that was used from the old ones.

You might also want to check out: Listed buildings: regulations and permissions for restoration

Permissions for alterations

Listed buildings are legally protected from any alterations or demolitions that are to be done unless they meet the terms for the building regulations. Certain permissions are necessary to be able to make changes to the windows, especially if the materials to be used are not like for like. Consult your local planning authority about these modifications to know more about what you can do to your windows. Afterwards, you can apply for a Listed Building Consent and get them approved to start replacements.

General approach on replacements

If repair is not possible anymore, then replacement may be
done to the windows. However, these are also subject to the terms of the building
regulations, and Historic England has listed several items to which they may
approach replacement of these historic items or materials.

  1. Historic windows which make a contribute positively to the significance of the listed building should be retained and repaired. If repair is not possible, replacements should be accurate copies.
  2. Current windows that already serve as replacements but still follow the historic pattern of the building should also be repaired and retained. If this is not possible, then replacements should also be accurate copies.
  3. For historic or replacement windows with historic pattern without the historic glass, slim-profile double-glazing should be installed given that there will be no damage to the windows, a common issue with thick double-glazing.
  4. Replacement windows which do not follow the design from historic patters should be replaced by new windows which adhere to the architectural design of the building. Single-glazed or slim-profile double-glazing may also be incorporated with no additional harm. This increases the significance of the building.
  5. When replacing or re-glazing the windows, reflective properties should be considered, especially when multi-paned windows are proposed. Broken reflections by individually glazing each pane can add to the aesthetic and should thus be taken into account. Matching the other windows may also be considered.  

These information along with more details are made available through this publication by Historic England.

Historic windows are an essential part of your listed property, and you should take every step to preserve it and its history. When all else fails, however, you have these tips with you to tell you how you can replace your traditional windows with ease!

This article was written on behalf of Boulton & Boyce by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

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Refurbishing sash windows: resolving common issues with modern solutions

Sash windows look great in the home, lending an old English feel to the place. It is a special feature of the house that many people look after to keep it in good shape rather than replacing it with another type of window. Sash windows have that sort of appeal. However, like all types of decor items that come from an older era, sash windows tend to be in need of refurbishing and updating to bring them up to date, making them look much more modern and giving them some functional detail like making them more energy-efficient, as older designs tend to be less energy efficient.

Sash windows

Sash windows comprise of huge movable panels, called sashes. The frame, usually made of wood or metal (in rare occasions), holds these sashes together in place. Bars known as glazing bars keep the panels of glass separated from each other and it is this distinctive arrangement that gives sash windows their unique looks and charm. Hinges fitted on sash windows allow them to close and open easily.

Common issues with sash
windows

With the passing of time, sash windows fall prey to several problems which necessitate a repair or refurbishment to improve its condition. Common issues that befall sash windows include rot in the wooden frames and sashes, some form of swelling and curviness of the underlying woodwork that leaves the glass unseated or in a precarious position, imbalance due to the distortion of the wood leading to instability in the wind, and so forth. It is also very common for the sliding mechanism of the sash window to fail over time, or for the painters to unknowingly paint the mechanism, leaving it permanently shut.

With such problems that plague sash windows, the question of refurbishment or repair arises, and homeowners must decide to choose the appropriate agency or repair personnel to get it fixed.

You might also want to check out: Two common sash window issues you can repair on your own

Refurbishments for sash
windows

Some problems in sash windows can be difficult to spot, like timber decay which happens inside the woodwork. However, even the most derelict, run-down, ill-maintained windows can be brought back to their glory days with a bit of good refurbishment work. The reason for the longevity and durability of older sash windows is the fact that they were built from a very durable form of timber known as heartwood, which is of very high quality. It is precisely for this reason that this wood needs to be retained as much as possible to ensure the longevity of the sash window.

Let us look at some common ways to be refurbish traditional sash windows: transforming them to modern-day standards while still retaining its old-world charm.

Replacing sash cords that
have failed

Sash windows hang from cords that are connected over a pulley system that connects again to a group of weights concealed behind the hollow ends of the window casing. The cords can break at any point in time. Therefore, you should replace old cords, especially for heavy windows. In order to replace the cords, the sashes need to be removed from the window first. Afterwards, it will ensure that the mechanism of the sash window will last for a very long time. A professional skilled in woodwork, known as a joiner, should perform this job to ensure proper handling.

Repainting sash windows

The original paint may start chipping and eroding from sash windows as they age, due to exposure to external environmental elements. The norm is to fix the paint on sash windows once every five years – the reason being that if the paint is replaced before any significant damage has occurred, you will spend a lot less time getting the windows prepped for the paint job than if you will have to repair it later.

Make sure that you have a qualified professional on-hand to do the work, as it can be quite hard to do it yourself without messing up the windows. Make sure that the glass portion of the windows are sealed before attempting to paint the wooden portion of the window, as it can be near impossible to rid glass panels of paint stains, especially if they have a chance to dry.

Upgrades for sash windows

Sash windows can also be upgraded
in order to help them become much more efficient, as they weren’t designed with
energy-efficiency in mind in the early days.

Wooden shutters

The use of a wooden shutter in
conjunction with the sash window helps increase the energy-efficiency by
preventing heat loss. These also aid in providing extra security to the
building, acting as an added layer of protection to the sash window. Unfortunately,
they have gone out of vogue in the present design trends, and as such, they
would require a good bit of modern design treatment to ensure that they look
good in the present day. Removing the extra layers of paint from an old shutter
may bring it back to its old glory. Treating old shutters that have suffered
from wooden rot is also a great way to bring back some life into it.

Secondary glazing

Another way to increase energy-efficiency
from old sash windows is to add a secondary layer of glazing to them. The way
that this can be done is to fit the secondary glazing to the window using a
side hanging glazing, or by using horizontal or vertical sliding windows to add
this secondary layer. The benefits of adding a secondary glaze layer to old
sash windows include reduced heat transfer, reduction in dust and pollutants
entering the room, as well as additional soundproofing layer for the room.

These upgrades make refurbishing sash windows a good, cost-effective option to bring them back to their former glory.

This article was written on behalf of Fix a Sash by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

The post Refurbishing sash windows: resolving common issues with modern solutions appeared first on Fix a Sash.

Sash Windows in London: why wooden sash windows are the best option for you

Windows are one of the most important aspects of any building. They can allow you to get natural light and control the airflow. Because of this, you might want to consider upgrading the windows on your property. When doing this, one of the best options to use is wooden sash windows from London. Let’s look at some of the benefits that this type of window will be able to produce.

Timeless Charm

One of the most important aspects of any window is how good they will look once installed. In this area, sash windows excel. They work well in all types of buildings. They can bring class to modern buildings. Alternatively, they will be able to fit in perfectly in historical buildings. Because of this, you will be able to style these windows in a variety of ways. In addition, you will be able to customize these windows. For example, you will be able to control the colour or finishing of the window. This will help ensure that you will be able to get the end results that you want.

Some Buildings Might
Require Sash Windows

In some cases, you might have limited say in the type of windows that you are able to install. Some buildings in the United Kingdom are listed. These buildings have great historical significance. When you purchase one of these properties, you need to take care of it. This can limit the type of fixtures that you can install, often limiting the type of materials that you are able to use. For example, you might not be able to put in modern metal window frames. In these types of buildings, wooden sash windows can be a great choice. It will be stylish while conforming with the heritage values of the property.

Protecting the Environment

Wooden sash windows are one of the most environment-friendly choices for any property. There are multiple reasons for this. First, compared to other building materials, wood takes fewer carbon emissions to produce and transport. In fact, sustainably planted materials will remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow, converting it to oxygen. Also, this material is designed to be able to be recycled. In addition, when you install this type of window, you will be able to lower the amount of electricity that you will need to use in your property.  

Ventilation and
temperature

When you use sash windows you will be able to control the amount of airflow in the building. This will allow you to adjust the temperature naturally, reducing your reliance on air conditioning. For example, if it gets too hot inside the building, you can simply open the window wider. This will allow more cold air into the building, cooling you down. This material is also designed to allow you to insulate your home during winter. Wood is able to keep more warm air inside the property. This will also be able to save you money, by reducing your power bill.

Durability

Wood is a very durable material. It features very strong natural fibres. This ensures that it will be able to take a lot of punishment. This is especially important in a country like England, where rain is common. Wood is still one of the longest-lasting materials that you can use to construct windows. In fact, in some cases, wooden windows have been able to last for around 60 to 80 years. This ensures that you will be able to go for a long time without needing to have your window frames repaired. It will also be able to help improve your home security. By using this tough material, it will be harder for intruders to break into your property.

Versatile

Wood is also one of the most versatile materials available today. You will be able to have greater control over the colour and the way that it’s finished. This will ensure that you are happy with the final product. You may also be able to extend the life of the windows by creating a layer around the wood. This will reduce the amount of damage that it gets exposed to. It also allows you to customize the frames more easily than any other material. In some cases, you might even be able to carve into the wood. This can create a distinctive design.

Suggested further reading: Box sash windows: your go-to stylish and functional sash window

Easy to Maintain

In recent years, technology has grown much more advanced. This has made maintaining wooden sash windows even easier. In the past, you had to worry about things like the paint blistering and having to have to re-paint it. Thankfully, the problem rarely occurs in modern windows. These materials have been treated to help prevent water retention issues, allowing them to breath more easily. This ensures that you can spend less time maintaining your windows and more time enjoying the light that they provide.

Reliable

Finally, wooden sash windows in London is one of the most reliable ways for you to add natural light and airflow to your property. Unlike some other types of windows, you don’t need to rely on electricity to operate these windows. In a storm, power can occasionally get disconnected. If this occurs while you are using electronic windows, you might not be able to close them. In addition, the mechanisms that operate sash windows are designed to provide smooth operations for years to come. Because this system is so simple, you will be able to take care of most maintenance issues yourself. This is a great way to save money, as you don’t need to call in a window repair company.

Conclusion

Sash windows remain one of the most popular window styles in London. As we discussed, there are several reasons why this style has continued to be a widely used option. Hopefully, this article has shown you some of the advantages of using this type of window in your property. So, consider getting a quote for wooden sash windows in London.  

This article was written on behalf of Fix a Sash by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

The post Sash Windows in London: why wooden sash windows are the best option for you appeared first on Fix a Sash.

Sash window prices in London: factors to consider to estimate the costs

Windows are one of the most important parts of your home. In most cases, they are one of the first things that someone sees when they look at your property. For this reason, you should make sure to invest in high-quality sash windows. These windows will give you the most control over the airflow coming into your property. They also suit a wide range of homes, from modern to historical. If you want to install these types of windows, you should know that there are several factors that will affect how much it will cost. Let’s look at some of these considerations, so you can accurately estimate sash window prices in London.

Size

One of the most important factors that dictate sash window prices in London is the size of the window. Generally, the larger the window, the more expensive it will be. This is because bigger windows will require more materials. There are a few steps that you can use to make sure that you get accurate measurements. First, you should make sure to take three horizontal measurements. Ideally, they should all be the same size. But if they aren’t, make sure to consider only the smallest size. You should repeat this process when measuring the vertical windows. This should give you a rough indication of how big the window will be. When you choose your window contractor, they will re-measure the window space more accurately.

Materials

The next factor that can affect the cost of the instalment is the type of materials that you want to use. For example, you can either choose a wooden frame or a metal frame. Each of these materials will have a different price. You should also consider the type of glass that you want. In some cases, you might want to tint the glass, making it darker. This can limit the amount of glare that you experience. It can also make your property more secure, as people will have more difficulty in seeing inside. However, this procedure can often make the windows more expensive to install.

Suggested further reading: Finding the appropriate repair parts for your sash window

Condition of the property

You might also want to think about the state of the property when you install your windows. This can affect whether you will encounter any unexpected problems. For example, if you have an older property, you might be more likely to get termites and wooden rot. This can impact on how easy it will be to install the windows. For example, in some cases, you will need to get the wall beams replaced or repaired before you can install the window. Because of this, the installation process will take longer and become more expensive.

Number of opening sashes

The sash is the part of the window that you can open and close. In most cases, you might only have one sash. However, larger windows might require two sashes. The more opening sashes you require, the more complex it will be to build the window. For this reason, these windows will be more expensive to install.

Colour and finish

You should also consider the type of finish you want. This will often vary, depending on the type of material that you choose to get. For example, if you get a wooden window, you might want to paint it, or you can simply stain the wooden frame. When considering which finish you want you should also think about how you will apply it. For example, will you stain the window yourself, or get a professional to do it for you?

Paying for professional installation

Once you have ordered and received your window, you will need to have it installed. While you can try to do this yourself, this isn’t recommended. There are several important stages in this process. If you do it incorrectly, it could damage the home. For example, the window might not be waterproofed properly, causing water damage inside the property. When you hire a professional company, your mind will be at peace, as you know that everything has been completed to a high standard. However, you will also need to pay for their fees. Generally, the more difficult the job, the more expensive it will be to get it installed. For example, you might want to customize the shape of the window or add a glass design. These elements are great ways to customize your window, but they will make it more expensive to install.

Get a quote

One of the best ways to make sure that you remain on a budget, you should make sure that you request a quote before any work begins. This will give you a rough idea of how much it will cost to install the windows. Most companies will be willing to visit your windows and provide a free quote. This is also a great chance to discuss your budget with the window installation company. They might be able to give you some tips on how you can reduce the cost of the process. As we discussed, several factors affect how much it will cost to install the window. It’s easy to overlook one of these elements when deciding on what window you want to install. By talking with a window installation company, they will be able to help guide you through the process, ensuring that you are happy with the finished product.

Conclusion

Sash windows remain one of the best ways to make an impact in London, suiting a wide range of buildings. However, as we discussed, there are several factors that affect sash window prices in London. By considering these factors you should be able to get a window that you are happy with and avoid breaking the budget. It’s also important to remember to be open to making changes. Often, you will need to deviate slightly from the plan to ensure that you complete the project on budget. Consider these factors to make sure that you get a great sash window at an amazing price.

This article was written on behalf of Fix a Sash by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

The post Sash window prices in London: factors to consider to estimate the costs appeared first on Fix a Sash.

Common issues and the repair solutions to modern sash windows

Sash windows are a great choice for all types of modern windows. It can add natural light, control airflow, and is a stylish addition to any building. However, it’s possible for these types of windows to get scratched or damaged over time. For example, the glass may get broken during a hailstorm. When damage does occur, you should take action to repair the sash windows. Let’s look at some of the best ways you will be able to do this.

Fixing Broken Glass

One of the most serious problems that you might encounter with your windows is that the glass can get scratched or broken. Depending on the level of damage, this can represent a safety hazard. When this occurs, you need to take action as quickly as possible. When replacing glass, you might want to contact a modern sash windows repair company. Repairing glass can often be a difficult job. For example, you need to cut the glass into the right shape and size. Then, you need to insert it into the window.

Cracked Paint

Another common problem that people might notice is that their sash windows have cracked paint. This is most common in environments that have temperature extremes. As the paint expands and contracts, it will become more likely to develop cracks. This can reduce the amount of protection on the frame, making it easier for mould to get established. It can also look unsightly. Thankfully, this is an easy problem for you to solve.

First, you will need to remove the window from the wall. Once down, you will need to go over the area with sandpaper. This will remove the layer of old paint and stain. Then, you will be able to apply a new layer of paint, in the chosen colour. Make sure to finish with a layer of stain, adding extra protection. Finally, you need to re-hang the window. By doing this, you will be able to see instant improvements in the window’s appearance. Often, a new paint job can make the whole thing look years younger.

You might also want to check out: Two common sash window issues you can repair on your own

Adjusting the Springs

In some cases, you might notice that the window doesn’t open or close the way it used to. This could be because the spring mechanism needs to be adjusted. Thankfully, this is a fairly simple process, which you should be able to complete in a few minutes.

First, you need to open the windows around 4 to 6 inches. Once done, you will need to release the sash from the window jamb. The exact method to do this will vary, depending on the type of window that you installed. Often, the instruction manual will contain details on how you can do this. After it’s been removed, you will be able to see the springs that operate the window. You should also see the adjustment spring. This will allow you to adjust how much tension is placed on the spring. Using a flathead screwdriver, either loosen or increase the tension in the spring. To test the window, put the sash back on and open and close the window. If necessary, repeat this procedure several times until you’ve found a comfortable amount of tension.

Swollen or Rotting Frame

In some cases, you might notice the wood around the frame has become swollen or started to rot. This can be a serious issue, affecting the whole structure. This is more common in older homes, where there might be less protection from water damage. If you notice this, you should make sure to get in contact with a modern sash windows repair company. This will allow them to send someone to the property to inspect the problem. They will be able to look at the window and decide the best course of action. If caught early, you might only have to replace one part of the frame. However, in some cases, you might need to replace the whole window. You might also need to get someone in to look at the surrounding wall, to make sure that it hasn’t been damaged.

Worn Out Rubber Seal

You may also notice that the rubber seal on your windows has worn out. This can make the windows less effective at insulating your property. Thankfully, there are a few ways that you can replace the seal. First, you might want to check the warranty on the windows. In some cases, you might be entitled to have the window replaced. Alternatively, you might want to call in a modern sash windows repair company. They will be able to look at the damaged seal. This will give you a better understanding of how serious it is. In some cases, you might even be able to repair the seal yourself.

Maintenance

By maintaining your sash windows, you will be able to prevent some of these problems from occurring. You will also be able to keep the windows looking great while extending their lifespan. First, you might want to make sure that the glass is kept clean. This will help prevent scratches, as well as allowing you to see the outside world more clearly. You should create a cleaning solution by mixing together hot water and vinegar. Then, dampen a sponge and wash the windows gently.

After you’ve washed the windows, you will need to use a squeegee to remove any excess moisture. Then, rinse the windows with water and use a sponge to dry the window. You should also regularly inspect your windows. This will allow you to spot the first signs of rot, taking quick action. In addition, you might want to make sure to oil the windows. This will ensure that they operate smoothly.

Conclusion

Sash windows remain a very popular choice. They can add timeless beauty to your building while helping you lower your electricity bill. Hopefully, you now know some of the problems which you might encounter when you own this type of window. Perform some of these repairs today to keep your window looking great.

This article was written on behalf of Fix a Sash by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

The post Common issues and the repair solutions to modern sash windows appeared first on Fix a Sash.

Sash windows in Brighton: from window types to repair services

A ‘sash’ window is a traditional style of sliding window in the format of a single frame for glazing and two sashes that slide up and down using a counterweight balancing mechanism. Each sash is made up of a number of small ‘lights’ or panes which are fixed together by astragal or glazing bars to contribute to the larger area of glazing. At the time at which sash windows rose in popularity, techniques in glass manufacturing were not yet advanced enough to allow for larger sections of clear glazing to be made at one time, so windows had to consist of multiple smaller sections of glass. These windows are often found in regency era homes being renovated.

Variations in the style

One common
variation in this traditional style is a ‘slider’ window, which features a
horizontally sliding sash window, also known as a Yorkshire sash. This style
uses the same sliding mechanism as the standard style of sash windows, with the
distinct difference that one of the sashes is usually fixed in place.
Interestingly enough, this design style actually pre-dates the more popular
vertical sash window.

Most commonly found in Georgian and Victorian-era houses, variations in the original sash window style can also be found in both late Victorian and Edwardian properties. They were an important part of British architectural history throughout the 17th – 19th century.

Knowing the design

The
specific design of your sash window will differ depending on the exact time
period it was initially from. Over the years, the most common styles have evolved
as public opinion on what was considered to be ‘in style’ fluctuated. Whether
you are replacing the existing sash windows in an older home or styling a new
property to match the design of a period-home, it is important to identify the
correct time period and select the right design in accordance with this. The
primary difference in styles over the decades is in the number of panes of
glazing in each sash:

  1. Georgian period homes: either six over six, or eight over eight style windows
  2. Victorian period homes: mainly two over two windows, but also a range of other variations including single-pane styles and sidelights
  3. Edwardian period homes: again, there were various common choices but the most common was the six over two windows

Authentic Sash Window
Replacements

Far too
often, people renovating period homes make the mistake of removing timber
sashes when they could have been restored and updated, or at least removed
safely and saved.

If the windows are beyond saving, however, there are plenty of companies who specialise in the manufacturing of authentic, period-style replacements. This is a fantastic option for those wanting to retain the original character of the house and charm that comes with this timeless style – without compromising the comfort and practicality of living in your home. The same can often be achieved with professional repairs – original timber is usually of a much higher quality than the newer products you would be able to purchase today. This timber is highly durable, while new wood will be less resilient and more prone to decay. This is also a practical long-term investment since well-repaired timber window frames can last an entire lifetime with the proper maintenance and care.

You might also want to check out: Repair or replace: how to deal with old sash windows

Getting repairs from
professionals

In addition
to this, properly restoring period features like sash windows could greatly
increase the value of your home.

Whether your windows are suffering from rotting wood in the frames, sticking sashes, foggy windows, excessive condensation, or damaged counterweight balancing mechanisms, getting a professional to come in and assess the damage will be the best choice. They will be able to help you decide if your sash windows are in need of replacement or can simply be restored. Of course, you will still have the final say in this matter, but the person assessing your windows will be able to identify all possible issues with and fixes for the material, the mechanism, or whatever else may be causing problems. It is often a fairly simple and quick job to repair most damaged sash windows, regardless of the level of decay or loss sustained. The professional should be able to give you a quote on price, but don’t expect this job to be particularly cheap. Between repairing or replacing your sash windows, you are likely to be paying anywhere from around £1000-£2000.

Improvements on period
sash windows

As far as improvements go, it may also be prudent to look into getting your period sash windows retrofitted with up-to-date features for improved daily life in your home. This may include improving the thermal performance of your windows replacing the old panes with double glazing while keeping the authentic traditional frames. It would also be worth it to draughtproof the box frame if this can be saved, though it is important with any updates and repairs to remain as true to the original period style as is possible with modern materials. Insulation can easily be retrofitted into these styles of windows and you may also want to consider getting them waterproofed.

Architectural history in
Brighton

Considering
the history of the development of Brighton as the vibrant, popular city we know
it as today, you may be surprised to learn that it was not always this way –
during the late 1700s and early 1800s, tourism soared as sea-side towns became
increasingly desirable as holiday destinations. As a result of this, the
landscape of the city began to develop and expand, most notably with the
addition of now-famous buildings like the Royal Pavilion and countless hotels
erected to capitalise on the rising popularity of the town.

The Royal Albion Hotel, built in 1826 in the regency style, is just one of many examples of buildings in Brighton constructed in this era with specific design features that were popular at the time, including iconic sash windows. This creates a particularly high demand for sash window repair and installation services available in the area. For this reason, if you are in need of repairs or replacements for your sash windows, Brighton has no shortage of companies who specialise in exactly that.

This article was written on behalf of Fix a Sash by Pieter Boyce. Pieter has an intense passion for English Architectural history and has been specialising in the conservation of original wooden windows and doors for decades. His exceptional knowledge of timber windows and doors, both listed or non-listed, is attributed to his hands-on approach to learning all aspects of the complete restoration of original features as well as having personally surveyed thousands of items throughout his long tenure as a head surveyor for one of the largest window and door restoration companies in the UK. He now runs a boutique wooden window and door consultancy and fervently champions the retention of original windows and doors. To learn more of Pieter’s services, visit his website at www.boultonboyce.co.uk.

The post Sash windows in Brighton: from window types to repair services appeared first on Fix a Sash.